How to create and manage a group of objects in AutoCAD.

A group in AutoCAD is a named and saved set of objects. The user can select and edit both the entire group and its individual objects. Groups are useful for managing multiple graphical objects in a consistent manner. You can create them quickly by assigning them default names.
Groups are useful for linking 3D bodies when you do not want to join them using a Boolean operation.

You can add or exclude items from a group at any time.

To some extent, groups resemble blocks, which also combine objects with a name, but in a slightly different way. For example, groups can be saved for use in future work sessions. The difference is that the user can edit individual objects in a group, whereas when working with blocks, you must first break the block into individual elements. Unlike blocks, groups cannot be used in other drawings.

When creating a group, objects are selected, its name and description are specified.

When you create a group, you specify its name and description.

When you copy a group, the new copy is named Ax by default; the new group is considered unnamed. Unnamed groups are not listed in the object Groups dialog box unless the Include unnamed option is selected.

If you select at least one element of the selected group, all its elements are included in the new group.

An object can belong to more than one group at a time, and a group can belong to other groups. You can Ungroup nested groups to restore the original group configurations.

When you use a drawing as an xref or insert block, named groups within the drawing are not available. However, the user can embed and then dismember an xref or block, after which the groups are made available as unnamed groups.

To create a group, you must type in the command line _GROUP, if you type-GROUP command parameters are displayed.

When group selection is enabled, groups can be moved, copied, rotated, and edited in the same way as individual objects. To edit an individual object in a group, turn off the group selection mode or use the handles on the object.

In some cases, it is useful to control the order in which objects belonging to the same group are selected. For example, a user program that defines toolpaths for numerical control may depend on a number of adjacent objects in a specified order.

Reordering elements can be done in two ways: either change the order of the individual elements (either one or more), or change the order of all elements. The numbering of group objects starts with 0, not 1.